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CM Trigger Boxshot 1

CM Storm Trigger Mechanical Keyboard Review

  1. Introduction
  2. Packaging and Specifications
  3. Closer Look
  4. NKRO/6KRO and User Experience
  5. Software Impressions
  6. Conclusion
  7. View All


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CM Storm has introduced a new mechanical keyboard in a town called Trigger- sporting with 5x Macro keys, 64KB memory for storing Macro and Keyboard profiles, 2x USB 2.0 with a 5v port and a wrist-rest pad. Worth the dough over one of my preferred gaming keyboard so far- Quick Fire pro?

Some premium/gaming peripherals come with the best of the stuff, but the packaging is pretty much as standard as you can imagine, but CM used Polyethylene Foam to protect the keyboard the way it should be.

Rest of the illustrations -as expected from CM Storm- says what you need to know. All the necessary information and features mentioned easily- everything mentioned in the box except the warranty period (unfortunately, this is an oversight by a lot of manufacturers).

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According to the advertised specs of the keyboard, this uses 6KRO Rollover with all keys having a backlight feature and the way to disable windows key.

Keeping aside the reading materials, you get the mini USB-to-USB 2.0 braided cable with a ferrite bead, the board itself and the wrist rest attachment.

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_MG_9565The plastic shell of the keyboard is of good quality as expected. The wrist rest area is about 18.5”x 3.5” and has a Rubber coat on it. Its a very large and comfortable wrist rest so people with large hands shouldn’t have any complaints.

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The Wrist rest has a simple clip that secures itself on the keyboard’s base properly.
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There’s also a small section on top of the arrow keys with the same rubber-ish feel.

One point to note, however. The good part of having a fairly used keyboard that is used and tested by many reviewers and gamers, in general, is that such peripherals go through a certain extent where you could get an idea of any potential wear and tear during the time of its use. When you’re looking closely at the images, you should see a part of the peel around the rubber-ish area (the border of the keyboard to has a rubber-ish grip).

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The rubber grip for the keyboard is present on the underbelly- same goes for the angled elevation.

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Some of the rubber grips, however, would probably come out much easier if the adhesive wears off after a long time. Not a con, but if larger and thicker strips were used on the wrist rest and the section where the plastic is moulded to hold these are made accordingly, it could be prevented.

The keys do have a soft finish, but not the same feel as the rubber-ish grip on the board.

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The Wrist rest is comfortable with and without the angled elevation.

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CM has 4 version of this keyboard and the difference between them are the keys. CM storm makes it a point to ensure that one can see this clearly in-front of the box. For those who do not know, Cherry Red MX keys are usually preferred for those who want a lesser feedback compared to Black MX counterparts. Before QuickFire Pro, I mostly preferred Cherry Red/Brown keys. Its after I evaluated Quick Fire Pro, the key tops play an important role along with the force feedback the of the mechanical key that you would be using.

The keys are laser etched, and the material that is used on keycaps is PBT Plastic.

As advertised, this keyboard uses 6KRO.

6KRO

ASXCTRL-AQ

SDCWAQ

WDE

Some of the usual key combos used during gaming works – as expected within CM Storm series.

However, by default, the windows key is turned off. The only way you can keep it enable is by manually setting the profile via Trigger’s software that can be downloaded via their product page. For a software to remap the keys, assign 5 profiles and to save them, 104MB Zipped file seems to be an awfully large to that job. The first version of the software is 144MB. That is large.

But why turn off Windows Key by default- and why not have to assign Alt+ F12 to toggle On/Off Windows button without the firmware- like QuickFire Pro?

For some reason, I feel the keys are a little bit cramped at first- but this is coming from a guy who uses TVSe Gold Cherry Blue MX keys mechanical keyboard to do most of the typing. There are certain differences between the keys, ignoring the point that TVS comes with PBS plastic and uses pad printing (aka as cheap-as-you-could-possibly-get). You’ll understand if I do a rough side-by-side comparison of the keys:

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The cylindrical shape of the keycap on the TVSe gold felt to be wider and the height of the key is much shorter compared to Trigger’s key- although a side-by-side comparison of the key’s base is the same. But as said on the top- it feels cramped because of the slight difference. Once- as a fellow mechanical keyboard user- you’ll get used to it. People who have been living with the membrane keyboard will have a length when it comes to a mechanical keyboard- but that’s something that’s expected naturally. Wrist rest feels great-

Now I want to see a new version of CM Storm keyboard- dimensions of QuickFire Rapid, feel of the keys and Windows On/Off toggle key from QuickFire Pro- and rubber-ish wrist rest in Trigger+ macro keys. Most of the gamers would prefer having macro keys over a Numpad. I am not sure how many people would like this kind of a keyboard- and if it would have lesser cost. But hey! You’ll never know. I wonder how that will work out.

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The keyboard comes with 2X USB 2.0 ports and a 5VDC power cable. I wasn’t able to get the 8GB Data Traveller powered up without the 5VDC power adapter with and without backlit. But I was able to power up+ install a brandless Bluetooth 2.0 USB drive.

Also, you do not get the 5VDC adapter with the keyboard to fully power up your USB ports.

You can toggle the backlit as on/partial backlit and off:

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After installing the software it takes about 30 seconds for the profiles to load up unless you have disabled it to launch with Windows as a startup item.

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Apart from the feature to turn on the Windows Key on by assigning the function of the key. But to be honest, the utility that lets you set Macro often have a habit of being too confusing. Keeping that in mind this is something that users could get accustomed to pretty easily

If you really don’t want 2X USB 2.0 ports on the keyboard, the only selling point of this board- compared to QuickFire Pro- is only the wrist rest and 64KB onboard memory+ 5x Macro keys- Windows Key On/off toggle ALT+F12 option (no- I didn’t forget the polling rate on Pro- but it doesn’t seem to matter to me when it comes to keyboards). The CM Storm Trigger should have everything that QuickFire Pro has and doesn’t has, but its not the case. If they windows key being off by default doesn’t bother you, its not really a con. If you’re like me who prefer that the standard options should work the way they should by default.
CM Storm has introduced a new mechanical keyboard in a town called Trigger- sporting with 5x Macro keys, 64KB memory for storing Macro and Keyboard profiles, 2x USB 2.0 with a 5v port and a wrist-rest pad. Worth the dough over one of my preferred gaming keyboard so far- Quick Fire pro? Some premium/gaming peripherals come with the best of the stuff, but the packaging is pretty much as standard as you can imagine, but CM used Polyethylene Foam to protect the keyboard the way it should be. Rest of the illustrations -as expected from CM Storm- says what you…

Review Overview

Built Quality - 9
Keycap Quality - 9
Features - 10
Gaming Combo Keystrokes - 10
Reviewer's Impression - 9

9.4

BBQ Score

Summary : Its a good keyboard, but between the Pro and Trigger- you have to buy based on your preference. My preference points towards the QuickFire Pro, but not having a wrist rest on the QuickFire Pro is a con where I have to bite my tongue. Damn!

India U.S. U.K.
Rs. 7999/- $119.99

The board comes with a two-year warranty period.

One comment

  1. the rubberizing on the wrist rest starts to wear off after a week of use. also, thesymbols are a little wonky at first, as the sybols are below the numbers, and the [ and ] and are not lit, instead {, }, and | are lit. you get used to it though. no other probs.

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