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Mastergel Maker Nano 5

Coolermaster MasterGel Maker Nano Thermal Compound Review

  1. Introduction, Packaging and Specifications
  2. Test Setup and Observations
  3. Conclusion
  4. Online Purchase Links
  5. View All


Disclosure: This review unit is supplied by Coolermaster.

It’s no surprise that Cooler Master is reinvigorating itself by introducing the Maker series. Previously, we reviewed their Master Case 5 which is aimed towards those who would like to expand their needs with the add-ons that they sell separately (and for modding).

We have many tried and tested thermal compounds in the market for mainstream and high-performance systems. Artic Cooling MX2 was the default choice for many users until multiple PC cooling manufacturing companies starting making thermal pastes. There is one company that makes CPU coolers and cases, but not a thermal paste. No prize for guessing which one it is.

Coolermaster’s experience with thermal compounds isn’t new, but this is probably the first aimed towards high-performance CPUs and GPUs. Therefore, it should not be of any surprise that the MasterGel Maker Nano is a thermal paste is aimed towards enthusiasts and overclockers to be used for CPUs, GPUs and chipsets. Like many conventional thermal compounds, this one is non-electrical conductive and does not require any curing, but it’s also made for long term use.

As Coolermaster says:

The Mastergel Maker Is developed for users needing the best thermal conductivity for high-performance CPUs, GPUs or even chipsets. The non-curing and non-electrical conductive traits help avoid any short-circuiting and provides protection and performance for long-term use.

The High-Tech nano diamond particles allow the MasterGel Maker to be extremely lightweight and easy to spread or remove while avoiding auto-oxidation or erosion over time.

What you should know is that Coolermaster is using something that they call it as high-tech nano-diamond particles. This should help to provide better conductivity with lesser gaps. You get a grease cleaner, a scraper to spread the thermal compound and obviously the thermal compound in a syringe. It contains 15ml so that’s plenty of applications for a single system user. The contents come in a blister packaging.

Mastergel Maker Nano 5

What separates one good thermal compound from the other is high thermal conductivity, low thermal resistance and preferably non-electrical conductive. It is also important that the compound should not oxidise the CPU/GPU/chipsets. Long lifespan is also appreciated especially for PC users in closed conditions.

Model MGZ-NDSG-N15M-R1
Colour Grey
Thermal Conductivity (W/m-K) 11
Specific Gravity (g/cm3)(25°C) 2.6
Volume (ml) 1.5
Net Weight (g) 4
Scraper Yes
Grease Cleaner Yes

The Mastergel maker has a specific gravity of 2.6 g/cm³ while the Artic MX2 is 3.96 g/cm³ and Noctua NT-H1 is 2.49 g/cm³.

Usually, I use a pea method for processors with smaller IHS such as the i7 4790K. For larger size IHS such as the i7-5960X, I prefer the three thin line method. I never needed to spread the thermal paste around, though the MX2 is very ‘fluid’ followed by the NT-H1. I prefer letting the thermal compound spread itself by the CPU heatsink. This way, the compound has a much better chance of even spread and filling the gaps between them. I’ve tried spreading thermal compounds at one point but getting them evenly spread is a task.

Spreading Mastergel maker Nano using the scrapper turned out to be a waste of time. The thermal compound is less fluidic and more sticky. This resulted in a horribly uneven spread and also some of the thermal paste stays on the scrapper. I decided to use the tried-and-tested pea, cross or a line method.

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