Home / PC Tech News / XBox dev gives advice to game designers about 30 FPS killjoy
xboxone-cover

XBox dev gives advice to game designers about 30 FPS killjoy

At the risk of being trolled by the angry villagers with pitchforks who are also the followers of the PC master race, many devs for games and consoles made a lot of comments about 30FPS limitation, as if its the thing. But then again, what were they even thinking! C’mon Ubisoft! 

xboxone-cover.png

Not everyone is in denial. Someone made an effort to under the real world implementations of higher frame rate effects on the human eye. Such is the case with Simon Cooke who is a developer in Xbox’s Advanced Technology Group. He said via his blog that our eyes work to capture extra information, roughly at 83.68GHz for average people. What this basically means is that 24FPS or 30FPS are well below the limit of an average person’s perception. He explained that one’s eyes will sample the same image two times and that it won’t be able to pull extra information. He also explained the difference of perception between a movie and a game.

In other words, Simon explained it in a very scientific-ish way (he was clear that some portion of his details might be speculation) that’s something a lot of us wouldn’t understand. But suffice to properly question a lot of claims about humans unable to see “beyond 30 FPS”. He said that game developers should consider a minimum of 43 FPS along with simulated grain, temporal antialiasing, jitter or other effects to mask the lower frame rate as it helps to extract more details. He also added that 43 FPS with 720p resolutions is better than 30fps on 1080p with simulated effects under certain amounts of motion.

In the end, he provided advice in the ascending order- aiming towards 43Hz considering TVs that you get for a while are 60Hz. Second is adding simulated effects to help to reduce the effect of lower frame rate counts. If the developers can afford to implement without compromises, it’s only then they should aim at higher resolutions.

The blog post is accompanied by very interesting points added by a lot of people, which makes more sense to read the entire content to appreciate the time and effort taken to actually understand.

But will game developers take this advice? That’s a tale for another day.

Source: 1

About Roshan Ashraf Shaikh

A fan of computer systems, components, peripherals and phones. Co-incidentally the owner of Hardware BBQ and Dawn of Tech

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*